The Incoherent Iconoclast RSS

This blog will be an amalgamation of cinema, politics, arsenal, hunting, all things Minnesota, and other interesting observations.

I'll post nightly clips from the picture I will watch that evening...plus, I'll post clips from pictures that I think are important and/or interesting.

Be warned of long-winded ranting and raving...All news will be from the last fortified compound on the Mississippi river in downtown Minneapolis.

Contact:
mississippi802@gmail.com

Archive

Feb
11th
Tue
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pickledelephant:

Andrei Tarkovsky while filming Stalker (1979)

(via fuckyeahdirectors)

Feb
6th
Thu
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Federico Fellini, Marcello Mastroianni and Sophia Loren on the set of 8 ½ (1963)

Federico Fellini, Marcello Mastroianni and Sophia Loren on the set of 8 ½ (1963)

(Source: pollyjeanharveys, via longhettis)

Jan
13th
Mon
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fuckyeahdirectors:

Howard Hawks and Angie Dickinson on-set of Rio Bravo (1959)

fuckyeahdirectors:

Howard Hawks and Angie Dickinson on-set of Rio Bravo (1959)

Dec
28th
Sat
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newshour:

All 3,313 Bigfoot sightings, mapped.

newshour:

All 3,313 Bigfoot sightings, mapped.

Jul
4th
Thu
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fuckyeahdirectors:

Michelangelo Antonioni and Monica Vitti on-set of L’Avventura (1960)

fuckyeahdirectors:

Michelangelo Antonioni and Monica Vitti on-set of L’Avventura (1960)

Apr
20th
Sat
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directingfilm:

You’ve got to remember that the cinema of the 1950s specialized all but exclusively in escapist entertainment. And we, I mean my generation of French film-makers, sought precisely to escape from that escapism. We were young and ambitious and we wanted to address the big issues from which the cinema preferred to avert its eyes – in my own case, the Holocaust, the atomic bomb, the Algerian war. Now, in France, 230 films are released every year and I would say that fully 60% consciously set out to expose some social or political abuse. It’s become almost the norm. Well, I dislike norms. Blissfully liberated from the pressure to compete, I’m free to play with what Orson Welles called the biggest electric train set in the world.

Alain Resnais on the change in tone of his films over the years (via heidisaman)

[Image: Top photo: Resnais directing Last Year at Marienbad (1961), bottom photo of Resnais by Bertrand Carrière]

(via directingfilm)

Apr
9th
Tue
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fuckyeahdirectors:

Jean-Luc Godard during the filming of Le Mepris (1963)

Apr
6th
Sat
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“Why do people go to the cinema? What takes them into a darkened room where, for two hours, they watch the play of shadows on a sheet? The search for entertainment? The need for a kind of drug? All over the world there are, indeed, entertainment firms and organizations which exploit cinema and television and spectacles of many other kinds. Our starting point, however, should not be there, but in the essential principles of cinema, which have to do with the human need to master and know the world. I think that what a person normally goes to the cinema for is time: for time lost or spent or not yet had. He goes there for living experience; for cinema, like no other art, widens, enhances and concentrates a person’s experience—and not only enhances it but makes it longer, significantly longer. That is the power of cinema: ‘stars’, story-lines and entertainment have nothing to do with it.”

“I see it as my duty to stimulate reflection on what is essentially human and eternal in each individual soul, and which all too often a person will pass by, even though his fate lies in his hands. He is too busy chasing after phantoms and bowing down to idols. In the end everything can be reduced to the one simple element which is all a person can count upon in his existence: the capacity to love. That element can grow within the soul to become the supreme factor which determines the meaning of a person’s life. My function is to make whoever sees my films aware of his need to love and to give his love, and aware that beauty is summoning him.”

Andrei Tarkovsky
April 4, 1932 — December 29, 1986

(Source: strangewood, via fuckyeahdirectors)

Mar
30th
Sat
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“People have curiosity, they have intelligence, they have interest in understanding their peers. But producers and directors of cinema have decided that the seats in the theaters have been made to transform people’s minds to lazy minds. As soon as they enter a theater they must become moron consumers who must be fed information. Those same people, when they leave the theater, when they look behind the curtains they are curious about their neighbors, they can guess if their neighbors are siblings or a couple, how old they are, what their occupation is. They are curious about each other and they can understand each other without being fed information. Why should it be different in cinema? In real life, when someone’s partner calls them, they can tell from the first word their partner says what their mood is. In my films, I try to give people as little information as possible, which is still much more than what they get in real life. I feel that they should be grateful for the little bit of information I give them. If they were as inquisitive when they come to watch my films as they are in real life, they’d make my life easier.” — Abbas Kiarostami, Filmmaker Magazine

“People have curiosity, they have intelligence, they have interest in understanding their peers. But producers and directors of cinema have decided that the seats in the theaters have been made to transform people’s minds to lazy minds. As soon as they enter a theater they must become moron consumers who must be fed information. Those same people, when they leave the theater, when they look behind the curtains they are curious about their neighbors, they can guess if their neighbors are siblings or a couple, how old they are, what their occupation is. They are curious about each other and they can understand each other without being fed information. Why should it be different in cinema? In real life, when someone’s partner calls them, they can tell from the first word their partner says what their mood is. In my films, I try to give people as little information as possible, which is still much more than what they get in real life. I feel that they should be grateful for the little bit of information I give them. If they were as inquisitive when they come to watch my films as they are in real life, they’d make my life easier.” — Abbas Kiarostami, Filmmaker Magazine

(Source: strangewood, via fuckyeahdirectors)

Dec
20th
Thu
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madelinecichocki:

Oh Duck Dynasty

madelinecichocki:

Oh Duck Dynasty

(Source: not-toast)

Nov
9th
Fri
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thechristdad:

Laugh of the day…follow my blog thanks.

(Source: thechristdad)

Oct
22nd
Mon
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designerwallcoverings:

Horses and bayonettes anyone? 
Mitt Romney Foreign Policy.

designerwallcoverings:

Horses and bayonettes anyone? 

Mitt Romney Foreign Policy.

Oct
21st
Sun
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(Source: bloodyadored)

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James Cagney & Jean Harlow in The Public Enemy,1931.

James Cagney & Jean Harlow in The Public Enemy,1931.

(via longhettis)

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Favourite Cinematography | Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)
Favourite Cinematography | Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)

(via longhettis)